Mind Labs to develop virtual humans for training purposes in healthcare

Mind Labs

Mind Labs to develop virtual humans for training purposes in healthcare

Together with 13 partners, Tilburg University will start a project totaling 7 million euros to develop virtual humans for training purposes in healthcare. The project called VIBE (Virtual Humans in the Brabant Economy) is the first project in Mind Labs, the initiative on interactive technologies and behavior set up in the Tilburg Spoorzone area.

The European Union, OP Zuid, the Ministry of Economic Affairs, the Province of North Brabant, and the city of Tilburg have funded this collaboration. In addition to Tilburg University (principal investigator), various partners are involved, including knowledge institutions (NHTV Breda, Fontys, ROC Tilburg), hospitals (Amphia, Maxima Medical Center and Spaarne Gasthuis), industry (BlueTea, IC3D Media, Indicia, Noldus, Samure, Visionair3D) and the Netherlands Aerospace Center. Continue reading “Mind Labs to develop virtual humans for training purposes in healthcare”

“High-precision 3D printing for biomedical applications” – Presented by Ruth Houbertz, Multiphoton Optics

High-precision 3D printing for biomedical applications- Presented by Ruth Houbertz, Multiphoton Optics

The interaction of fs laser pulses with hybrid materials is of high interest. Since the triggered reactions are strongly confined to the focal region, the formation of free-form 3D-printed micro-/nanostructures can be easily carried out with highest precision. The method’s appeal is an intrinsic scalability from the 100 nm to the cm regime. For the restoration of diseased or damaged tissue, the growth of cells on 3D porous scaffolds for tissue engineering is a promising approach to generate autologous tissue. The influence of structure type and size is shown for primary human microvascular endothelial cells.

About Dr. Ruth Houbertz Continue reading ““High-precision 3D printing for biomedical applications” – Presented by Ruth Houbertz, Multiphoton Optics”

3D Printing Future Applications in Restaurants and Nursing Homes (Video)

As we inevitably grow older and our bodies begin to descend with age, chewing and swallowing some of our favorite foods become one of the many difficulties we may have to face as people reach an elderly age. Harmful conditions such as strokes and dementia often lead to a loss in eating abilities, forcing older people to settle for unfavorable ‘mash-type’ meals, which are much less nutritious and appealing then they could be. Continue reading “3D Printing Future Applications in Restaurants and Nursing Homes (Video)”

New 3D Printed Wireless EEG Headset Makes Possible Brain-Computer Interfacing

Imec, the Holst Centre and The Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research, along with the Industrial Design Engineering faculty of Delft University of Technology, have introduced a wireless electroencephalogram – or EEG – headset that is both comfortable and delivers a high-quality signal. Continue reading “New 3D Printed Wireless EEG Headset Makes Possible Brain-Computer Interfacing”

Using Additive Manufacturing To Print Glucose Sensors To Manage Diabetes

Engineers have developed a technique similar to inkjet printing that hey used to fabricate a new glucose sensor for the management of diabetes. The researchers claim the new system is more precise and efficient, and less costly, than current manufacturing methods and could lead to an artificial pancreas with a single point of bodily entry. Continue reading “Using Additive Manufacturing To Print Glucose Sensors To Manage Diabetes”

Engineering a Better Heart (INFOGRAPHIC)

<p style=”text-align: justify;”>While it’s difficult for me to criticize something as complex and impressive as the human heart, it’s clear that to help manage cardiovascular disease, it could use some assistance. Since it can’t repair itself like some other body parts, trauma to the heart results in tissue death, which can eventually lead to heart failure.<!–more–></p>
<p style=”text-align: justify;”>Is there a solution to this? With today’s new technologies, will it possible for mankind to actually engineer a better heart?</p>
<p style=”text-align: justify;”>Last week, my post “Can Science and Technology Fix a Broken Heart?” started a conversation between myself (a practicing cardiologist) and Dr. Adam Feinberg (a leading biomedical engineer at Carnegie Mellon University’s College of Engineering). In this week’s post, our conversation continues, and we’ll outline some of the exciting developments that are on the horizon for heart treatment.</p>
<p style=”text-align: justify;”>Q: Dr. Feinberg, you recently received a $500,000 grant from the National Science Foundation for a bioprinting project that you’re working on. What is bioprinting, and how does this impact heart engineering?</p>
<p style=”text-align: justify;”>A: Bioprinting is the medical world’s utilization of what’s proven to be a revolutionary method of manufacturing: 3D printing. 3D printing is really unique because it completely changes the way we build things. It enables us to build a structure layer-by-layer; think of it like stacking sheets of paper to create a thicker 3D object. With this approach you can create incredibly complex structures in 3D, which is potentially game-changing for tissue engineering because organs like the heart are so intricate and difficult to replicate. However, to date, it has been extremely difficult to 3D bioprint soft materials such as cells and collagen at high resolution. … <a href=”http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-cynthia-thaik/engineering-a-better-heart_b_6844130.html” target=”_blank”>(read more)</a></p>
<p style=”text-align: justify;”>Source: HuffingtonPost.com</p>

New Medical Sensors To Improve The Health Outcomes Of Ebola Patients

The Scripps Translational Science Institute (STSI) has received a grant from the US Agency for International Development (USAID) to create a programme that will use medical sensors to improve the health outcomes of Ebola patients. The programme is called STAMP2, short for Sensor Technology and Analytics to Monitor, Predict and Protect Ebola Patients. Continue reading “New Medical Sensors To Improve The Health Outcomes Of Ebola Patients”

Organovo, Yale School of Medicine form collaboration to develop 3D organ tissues for surgical transplantation research

Organovo, a three-dimensional biology company focused on delivering breakthrough 3D bioprinting technology, and Yale School of Medicine, Department of Surgery have formed a collaboration to develop bioprinted tissues for surgical transplantation research, made possible by a generous gift from the Methuselah Foundation. Continue reading “Organovo, Yale School of Medicine form collaboration to develop 3D organ tissues for surgical transplantation research”