International privacy regulation: Compliance officers react extremely defensive – Herman Bennema, Vektis

Herman Bennema

International privacy regulation: Compliance officers react extremely defensive – Herman Bennema, Vektis

Herman Bennema is CEO of Vektis, the leading healthcare information provider in the Netherlands. Mr Bennema is an experienced executive with an inherent strength of improving businesses based on analytical insight. Under his leadership, Vektis evolved from an organization focused on collecting healthcare claims-data to an information provider for the entire healthcare system in the Netherlands. Prior to Vektis, Mr Bennema was boardmember of Solera Netherlands, specializing in automobile related claims. Herman started his career as a technical officer in the Royal Netherlands Airforce after finishing his education at the Royal Military Academie. He also holds a graduate degree in business economics. Herman Bennema will speak on Jan 31, at Health Tech Event in Maastricht, about Big data for healthcare. Continue reading “International privacy regulation: Compliance officers react extremely defensive – Herman Bennema, Vektis”

Virtual Reality, Used to Insert a Stent into a Cardiac Artery for the First Time

Virtual reality technology, over recent years, has improved in leaps and bounds. Technical difficulties and a prohibitively high price tag have kept it largely under the radar in terms of usable technology, but the tide seems to be turning.

Although certain medical specialities already use Virtual reality (VR) as a training tool, the technology is largely kept out of the operating room. Continue reading “Virtual Reality, Used to Insert a Stent into a Cardiac Artery for the First Time”

Hospital Hack Shows How Vulnerable Firewalls and Medical Devices Are

In the fall of 2013, Billy Rios flew from his home in California to Rochester, Minn., for an assignment at the Mayo Clinic, the largest integrated nonprofit medical group practice in the world. Rios is a “white hat” hacker, which means customers hire him to break into their own computers. His roster of clients has included the Pentagon, major defense contractors, Microsoft, Google, and some others he can’t talk about. Continue reading “Hospital Hack Shows How Vulnerable Firewalls and Medical Devices Are”

Samsung’s bio-processor for wearables tracks multiple and dynamic biometrics with a single chip

Being able to monitor fitness in increasingly diverse and efficient ways is a major health priority.

It is no longer acceptable simply to provide a range of different bio-sensors. Built with small form-factor devices in mind, Samsung Bio-Processor empowers users with a combination of fitness sensors and continues to perform well with low battery power.

Easily implement a multitude of bio-data Continue reading “Samsung’s bio-processor for wearables tracks multiple and dynamic biometrics with a single chip”

EpiWatch App Tracks Epilepsy Symptoms and Shares Data, Helping Monitoring, Improvement of Condition (Video)

Johns Hopkins EpiWatch™ is an app for Apple Watch™ and research study. EpiWatch helps you manage your epilepsy by tracking your seizures and possible triggers, medications and side effects. You can view this information at any time, and a dashboard lets you share a summary of the data with your doctor or caregiver if you want. With EpiWatch, you can also send a message to family members or caregivers to let them know when you are tracking a seizure. Continue reading “EpiWatch App Tracks Epilepsy Symptoms and Shares Data, Helping Monitoring, Improvement of Condition (Video)”

New Wearable Device Instantly Delivers Info such as Vitals to Doctors as They Operate (Video)

For all of its promising ideas and potential, Google Glass can, at best, be summed up as a noble failure. In trying to appeal to as broad of an audience as possible, the resulting device offered little in the way of real world utility. But there were lessons to be learned, and those paying attention are iterating. Continue reading “New Wearable Device Instantly Delivers Info such as Vitals to Doctors as They Operate (Video)”

Wired Wellness: Recent medical technology implemented by hospitals

Recent medical technology advances at Dubuque hospitals can provide patients information via their television screens and vital-sign information at a nurse’s fingertips.

“We are constantly implementing new technology or upgrading technology. There are things constantly going on,” said Kay Takes, president of Mercy Medical Center-Dubuque.

Devices and programs introduced or about to be unveiled streamline information delivery and increase precision during procedures.

“It’s grown exponentially in last 10 years,” said Diana Batchelor, chief nursing officer at UnityPoint Health-Finley Hospital. Continue reading “Wired Wellness: Recent medical technology implemented by hospitals”

Virtual Reality Technology Used in Video Games Is Quickly Moving towards the Medical Field

Santa Barbara-based WorldViz is the software company giving folks the chance to challenge their fears and phobias Sunday in a hands-on demonstration at the Fess Parker Resort. Cottage Rehabilitation Hospital Foundation is helping the company showcase its technology with expert Skip Rizzo.

“We’ll do a huge phobia demo called The Pit,” said Ned Atkins, event manager at WorldViz. Continue reading “Virtual Reality Technology Used in Video Games Is Quickly Moving towards the Medical Field”

Virtual Reality In Healthcare: Current State and Prospects for Future

Virtual reality is no longer just about video gaming; it holds promise as nothing short of revolutionary for just about every other industry, as well.

Since 2012, there has been an incredible explosion of interest and hype around mass market virtual reality (VR) thanks to head mounted display (HMD) products in development like the Oculus Rift, HTC Vive, Gear VR and Google Cardboard.

The technology has advanced to the point where very high-quality VR experiences are possible at reasonable price points, and should be widely available to consumers within a year. There are a few industries that have been making use of VR technology for decades, and healthcare is one of them. The number of virtual reality-related research articles in the Pubmed database have increased over the last 10 years from 204 publications in 2004 to 720 publications in 2014.

However, there are still a fairly modest number of technology companies translating this research into practical VR applications. The field seems to be dominated by academic research and development, with some private industry collaboration. Most companies today are working on the same kinds of applications that clinicians have used since at least the early 1990s. There are probably many companies in early development and operating in stealth mode in this space, so it will be interesting to see what surfaces over the next 12 months.

The industry is poised for disruption, and a shift toward patient-centric and individualized healthcare is already underway. The history and current state of virtual reality in healthcare is outlined in detail in the following sections.

Virtual Simulations For Medical Training And Education

Virtual simulation technology has come a long way since the Sensorama Simulator from 1962. Over the past couple of decades, virtual reality and simulation technology has been implemented in healthcare training and education. Surgery simulators have been invaluable for physician training, and hospitals have paid large sums of money for this specialized equipment. We should be glad, as I can’t imagine anyone wanting to volunteer to be a surgeon’s “first.”Read more

Source: techcrunch.com