Organ-on-a-chip could improve blood testing for patients

Organ-on-a-chip

When studying diseases or testing potential drug therapies, researchers usually turn to cultured cells on Petri dishes or experiments with lab animals, but recently, researchers have been developing a different approach: small, organ-on-a-chip devices that mimic the functions of human organs, serving as potentially cheaper and more effective tools.

Now, researchers have built a new device that’s especially good for modeling atherosclerosis — the constriction of blood vessels that’s the leading cause of heart attacks and strokes. In a paper appearing this week in APL Bioengineering, from AIP Publishing, researchers illustrate how the new device can be used to study important inflammatory responses in cells that line the vessel in ways that could not be done in animal models. The research team also explains how this organ-on-a-chip could improve blood testing for patients. Continue reading “Organ-on-a-chip could improve blood testing for patients”

“Analytical challenges with the production of Biopharmaceuticals” – Presented by Dominic Carolan, NIBRT

“Analytical challenges with the production of Biopharmaceuticals” – Presented by Dominic Carolan, NIBRT.Biopharmaceuticals manufacture is complex and challenging, requiring the manipulation of living cells. The adoption of novel online/atline analytical techniques and disposable sensors offer the potential to ultimately lead to real time product release with a resulting dramatic improvement in the quality and safety of biopharmaceuticals with accompanying reduction in the cost of manufacture.

About Dominic Carolan Continue reading ““Analytical challenges with the production of Biopharmaceuticals” – Presented by Dominic Carolan, NIBRT”

Water-based “Band-Aid” senses temperature, lights up, and delivers medicine to the skin (Video)

Typical synthetic hydrogels are brittle, barely stretchable, and adhere weakly to other surfaces.

“They’re often used as degradable biomaterials at the current stage,” Zhao says. “If you want to make an electronic device out of hydrogels, you need to think of long-term stability of the hydrogels and interfaces.” Continue reading “Water-based “Band-Aid” senses temperature, lights up, and delivers medicine to the skin (Video)”