Smart prosthetic leg equipped with sensors will alert users to wear & tear

Smart prosthetic leg

Smart prosthetic leg equipped with sensors will alert users to wear & tear

Traditional leg prosthetics depend on soft limb tissue to function and can be painful to wear, resulting in awkward walking motion and possible skin infection.

To overcome these limitations, the US Office of Naval Research (ONR) is partnering with Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, the Naval Research Laboratory and several universities to develop MOIP (Monitoring OsseoIntegrated Prostheses).

“MOIP not only can improve quality of life, but also usher in the next generation of prosthetic limbs,” said Dr Liming Salvino, a program officer in ONR’s Warfighter Performance Department.

According to ONR, leg prosthetics most commonly fit amputees’ residual limbs via a socket that encloses the limb. Because the socket exerts pressure on the limb’s soft tissue, pain and chafing, sores and blisters, and infection can occur. Amputees often have their socket prosthetics adjusted, which is inconvenient and costly. Consequently, many amputees give up prosthetics for wheelchairs. Continue reading “Smart prosthetic leg equipped with sensors will alert users to wear & tear”

“Industrial landscape on food and beverage market” spectrometers for the pharma,- Presented by Clémentine Bouyé, Tematys

Industrial landscape on food and beverage market” spectrometers for the pharma,- Presented by Clémentine Bouyé, tematys.Both in the pharmaceutical and in the food & beverage industry there is a need for quality and process control, at every stage of the production and/or the transformation process from the analysis of raw materials to the test of packaging. Continue reading ““Industrial landscape on food and beverage market” spectrometers for the pharma,- Presented by Clémentine Bouyé, Tematys”

New method for rapid detection of wound infection uses disposable electrochemical sensor

A new method for detection of infection in wounds could take physicians less than a minute to complete, rather than the current 24 hours it takes to plate bacteria and leave it to incubate overnight, according to research by the George Washington University’s (GW) Victoria Shanmugam, M.D. Continue reading “New method for rapid detection of wound infection uses disposable electrochemical sensor”

Samsung’s bio-processor for wearables tracks multiple and dynamic biometrics with a single chip

Being able to monitor fitness in increasingly diverse and efficient ways is a major health priority.

It is no longer acceptable simply to provide a range of different bio-sensors. Built with small form-factor devices in mind, Samsung Bio-Processor empowers users with a combination of fitness sensors and continues to perform well with low battery power.

Easily implement a multitude of bio-data Continue reading “Samsung’s bio-processor for wearables tracks multiple and dynamic biometrics with a single chip”

Wearable Sensors Could Translate Sign Language into Text

Wearable sensors could one day interpret the gestures in sign language and translate them into English, providing a high-tech solution to communication problems between deaf people and those who don’t understand sign language.

Engineers at Texas A&M University are developing a wearable device that can sense movement and muscle activity in a person’s arms. Continue reading “Wearable Sensors Could Translate Sign Language into Text”

Stanford Engineers Create Plastic Skin-like Material that Can Send Pressure Sensation to Brain Cell (Video)

Stanford engineers have created a plastic “skin” that can detect how hard it is being pressed and generate an electric signal to deliver this sensory input directly to a living brain cell.

Zhenan Bao, a professor of chemical engineering at Stanford, has spent a decade trying to develop a material that mimics skin’s ability to flex and heal, while also serving as the sensor net that sends touch, temperature and pain signals to the brain. Ultimately she wants to create a flexible electronic fabric embedded with sensors that could cover a prosthetic limb and replicate some of skin’s sensory functions. Continue reading “Stanford Engineers Create Plastic Skin-like Material that Can Send Pressure Sensation to Brain Cell (Video)”

Researchers Develop New Method for Producing Inexpensive, High-Performing Wearable Patches

A team of researchers in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin has invented a method for producing inexpensive and high-performing wearable patches that can continuously monitor the body’s vital signs for human health and performance tracking, potentially outperforming traditional monitoring tools such as cardiac event monitors. Continue reading “Researchers Develop New Method for Producing Inexpensive, High-Performing Wearable Patches”